The Breath of the Earth

WY022405085 BLOG-Turner Sunset I

In February, amongst Yellowstone’s geysers, the earth’s breath ascends into a frigid winter day.

I’ll lift you and you lift me, and we’ll both ascend together. — John Greenleaf Whittier

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Beautifully Brutal

or-1218-2016-131-on1Winter’s bullied the Willamette Valley this season, slapping us with snow, ice, and inconvenience.

or-1218-2016-044In December, freezing rain brought widespread power outages; the damage to trees, especially the oaks, epitomized a brutal side of nature. A lesser storm iced the roads again this week, while another brief round may arrive tomorrow.

or-1218-2016-053-on1Meanwhile, the temperature in Wisdom, Montana, fell to -46°F the other day.

There’s no such thing as bad weather, just soft people. —Bill Bowerman

Snow Lines

Nature 2200 snow copy

“I believe most things can be said in a few lines.” —Enzo Ferrari

Nature 2106 snow

“A lot of people like snow. I find it to be an unnecessary
freezing of water.” —Carl Reiner

Nature 2120 ice copy

“There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.” —Leonard Cohen

(N)ice

OR-1982-ice-Fish Lake 001

We’re having a respite from high temperatures today, breezy, cool, and rainy. Not this cold, of course, once upon a winter at a small lake in the Oregon Cascades.

“It isn’t necessary to imagine the world ending in fire or ice. There are two other possibilities: one is paperwork, and the other is nostalgia.” —Frank Zappa

The Lights at The End of Tunnel Vision

OR-1982-218tunnel

What attracts us to our photographic subjects? In 1982 this was just ice on a sunny January afternoon, a moment enjoyed for its crispness and clarity, its abstractness. Suggestions. And I moved on. Now, another question—why do I see it this way today? That’s probably as unanswerable as the older question I didn’t pause to consider all those years ago. So I’ll continue looking at things, differently when I can, and not worry unduly about unconscious motives, or correct answers.

“It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers.” —James Thurber